Golf And Low Back Pain

 By: Erik Dalton
We see it all the time on sports channels. How do they do it? That golf swing is really a work of art. Entailing such a complex array of finely coordinated movements, it's no wonder a golfer's body is considered a ticking time bomb for acute injury or chronic pain.

Recent stats: 53 percent of male and 45 percent of female golfers suffer low back pain; 30 percent of professional golfers play injured; 33 percent of golfers are over the age of 50; and playing golf and another sport increases chance of injury by 40 percent.

Researchers agree that a greater part of injuries affecting male golfers manifest in the low back and are related to improper swing mechanics and/or the repetitive nature of the game. The amateur or weekend golfer typically experiences injuries due to improper swing mechanics, whereas the sports professional is more likely to fall victim to overuse injuries from obsessive repetitive movement patterns. When a high velocity rotary force couples with trunk sidebending (the crunch factor), the golfer's spine and deep paravertebral tissues take a pounding. No wonder low back pain (LBP) is the most widespread golfer complaint!

To hit the ball a great distance, the body must have the ability to rotate into and maintain a wide arc throughout the swing. Manual therapy techniques that increase range of hip turn allow a decrease in the amount of shoulder turn, thus reducing the amount of trunk flexion and sidebending during the downswing (the most damaging moment of the swing). If golfers lack full range of hip mobility due to an adhesive capsule, powerful torsional forces will travel up the kinetic chain through lumbopelvic ligaments, joint capsules and intervertebral discs. Motion-restricted facets and damaged ligamentous tissue can neurologically inhibit deep spinal groove muscles such as rotatores, multifidus and intertransversarii leading to substitution patterns and low back instability.

Reported in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2008), University of South Australia researchers learned that golfers with LBP were overly dependent on erector spinae muscles for spinal stabilization rather than allowing load transfer to be distributed among more efficient lumbopelvic stabilizers such as quadratus lumborum, transverse abdominus, multifidus, hip extensors, and thoracolumbar fascia.4 They theorized that the brain, sensing weakness, is forced to recruit global muscles (lumbar erectors and obliques) to counterweigh for the weakened deep spinal stabilizers. The question is, "What mechanism instigates the deep lumbopelvic stabilizers to weaken?"

Reconnecting the Disconnect

The body's myofascial system is built from a continuous arrangement of tissues intended to function in organized patterns, not as isolated muscle groups. When operating properly, energy is efficiently transmitted via force-coupling through a reaction chain rooted in the ground. Motor unit recruitment only becomes isolated to a specific muscle group when the brain senses a system disconnect and calls in "the subs." For example, during a golf swing, if a fibrosed hip capsule were blocking energy transfer up the kinetic chain, normal force-coupling would suffer due to lack of mobility of the femoral head in the acetabulum. (Fig 3) The manual therapist must first mobilize the fixated joint in all three cardinal planes, and then move up the kinetic chain to assess and correct any sacroiliac or lumbar compensation that may be driving the golfer's back pain.

Successful treatment of golf-related injuries not only needs golf swing modifications and functional rehab, but, in most cases, restoration of proper lumbar lordosis. Too much or too little curve results in extreme torsional and compressive loads through the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral junctions. The myoskeletal approach starts by correcting lower crossed muscle imbalance patterns followed by restoration of "joint-play" to fixated low back, sacroiliac and thoracic articulations.
loading...
Author:
Artice Source: http://www.articlesphere.com

Related Articles in Back Chronic Pain


People interested in the above article are also interested in the related articles listed below:

If you live with chronic pain, life might seem unbearable at times. Unlike acute pain, which is the body's way of telling us that something is wrong, chronic pain is on-going pain that serves no useful purpose. This kind of pain could present in many different forms. It could be on-going back pain, rheumatism or arthritis which causes hand joint pain, inner knee pain, chronic headaches, or any pain associated with chronic illness. Chronic pain is pain that serves no useful purpose. It can be truly debilitating. Here are some useful tips on how to ease such pain and better manage it.
Disc pain is usually caused by spinal disc herniation, spinal stenosis or muscle strain. Discogenic back pain is also a common form of back pain which is caused by wear and tear of the disc arising with increasing age and causing disc degeneration. Sciatica pain is caused when the liquid from within the center of a disc in the spinal cord herniates outside into the spinal canal and compresses a nerve root.
Many of today's medical texts tell us the coccyx fuses into one rigid segment by adulthood in most people. However, several well-designed studies have shown that a normal coccyx should have two or three movable parts that gently curve forward and slightly flex as we sit. Two medical papers (Postacchini and Massobrio1 and Kim and Suk2) found that test subjects with fused coccyxes that didn't flex upon sitting were more prone to experience tailbone pain than those with a normal coccyx.
loading...

More in Back Chronic Pain

Excellent, Larry. Thank you for taking the new article directory technology and making it work to the max. I encourage everyone to keep contributing and contributing regularly. I can attest to the fact that this site is already a strong directory in a field of many. Kudos to Larry!

Matthew C. Keegan
The Article Writer

 

I find it a delight to use both as an author and a publisher. It is full of nice little surprises that make the whole process of writing, reading and publishing articles a complete delight. This is one that comes out tops and beats the rest hands down.

Eric Garner
Managing Director
ManageTrainLearn

 

I did a Google search and came across your site. It was exactly what I was looking for and was elated to find such a broad range of articles. As I am launching a free magazine in a small town in Florida, I wanted to be as resourceful as possible while still being able to provide some content that is interesting and well written. Your site has all the variables in the mix. Excellent Site hitting all the notes in the scale sort of speak.

Mo Montana
Florida, USA

Article Topics

 
Copyright © 2005 - by Larry Lim, Singapore - Article Search Engine Directory at ArticleSphere.com™
All Rights Reserved Worldwide. All Trademarks and Servicemarks are the property of the respective owners.
ArabicBulgarianCatalanChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CzechDanishDutchEnglishEstonianFinnishFrenchGermanGreekHaitian CreoleHebrewHindiHungarianIndonesianItalianJapaneseKoreanLatvianLithuanianNorwegianPersianPolishPortugueseRomanianRussianSlovakSlovenianSpanishSwedishThaiTurkishUkranianVietnamese